Updates on GMAP and a Happy New Year!

The team at the Gender and Mine Action Programme wishes you a happy New Year 2018! We are preparing for a busy and exciting year, and we are looking forward to deepening relationships with partners to continue promoting equality and inclusion in mine action.     The last weeks of 2017 have been eventful, with […]

The team at the Gender and Mine Action Programme wishes you a happy New Year 2018! We are preparing for a busy and exciting year, and we are looking forward to deepening relationships with partners to continue promoting equality and inclusion in mine action.

 

 

The last weeks of 2017 have been eventful, with GMAP’s participation to the 16 Meeting of State Party to the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention, which was taking place in Vienna. GMAP co-hosted a side event on women’s empowerment with the Delegation of Canada. GMAP Director Arianna Calza Bini moderated the panel, which featured speakers from the ISU-Convention on Cluster Munitions, the HALO Trust, Mines Advisory Group, the Landmines Resource Centre for Lebanon from the University of Balamand, Mines Action Canada, and finally Global Affairs Canada. Each panellist illustrated the various ways mine action can create the conditions for women’s empowerment, and richly contributed to what will be an on-going conversation in the sector.

The 16 MSP to the APMBC also underlined the 20 years since the adoption of the Convention. Data from the Landmine Monitor revealed that the previous year unfortunately saw the highest ever recorded number of casualties since 1999, with 8,065 mine/ERW casualties. This sharp increase from the previous years is alarming. It is also the most child casualties ever recorded, accounting for 42% of all civilians casualties, and the highest number of annual casualties caused by improvised mines. The majority of known civilian casualties were men; women and girls made up 16% of all casualties where the sex was known, a slight increase compared to 2015 and recent years. GMAP stresses that all casualty data should be recorded in a sex and age disaggregated manner and that data on the indirect victims should also be collected, to fully understand the extent of the harm caused by mines and other explosive remnants of war, as well as respond to the needs of all women, girls, boys and men victim of mine/ERW accidents.

Stay tuned for more updates from GMAP, and for our upcoming events and activities.